Book Reviews

The Babylonian Talmud

A Translation and Commentary

Jacob Neusner Peabody, MA 2007-10-30

Since the publication of Alfred Edersheim’s two-volume The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah (1899; reprint, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1962) the value of Jewish literature for gaining a better understanding of the New Testament in general and the Gospels in particular has been clear to the wider reading public. The problem scholars had in using and recommending Edersheim’s work was his sweeping use of Jewish material, especially the Babylonian Talmud, without addressing issues of dating as it might apply to the first century (especially problematic since the Talmud was compiled some five hundred years later near the end of the sixth century). The proper use of Talmudic material for New Testament studies is still debated, although no one doubts its benefit and relevance.

This edition by Neusner is therefore a welcome addition, not only because of its careful translation but also because of the explanatory commentary that accompanies each of the thirty-seven tractates. English readers previously had access to the Talmud through the translation of I. Epstein and a team of British Jewish scholars in the Soncino Hebrew/English edition. That translation remains a helpful tool, but Americans will find the clarity of Neusner’s translation a welcome improvement, and the explanatory commentary is a great help in clarifying the meaning of the rabbinic dialogue. This is the most readable and understandable translation of the Talmud available, with introductions that orient the reader to the subject matter at hand and the particular Bible verses under discussion. The availability of both the Soncino edition and Neusner’s translation in CD-ROM format is a particular benefit.

Book reviews are published online and in print every quarter in Bibliotheca Sacra. Subcribe Today

David K. Lowery
Dr. David Lowery retired from full-time faculty service at DTS after 42 years of faithful service in the department of New Testament Studies. He graduated with his ThM degree in 1975 and earned his PhD in 4987 from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland. He did postdoctoral work at Tübingen University in Germany and at Cambridge University in the UK.Dr. Lowery contributed to the New American Standard Bible and the NET Bible. He taught in Europe, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and the South Pacific. His particular ares of focus in the NT are Matthew, Mark, and Paul's letters. In addition to his extensive academic pursuits, Dave was involved in church planting and ministry for over three decades in Vermont and Texas. Dave and his wife Deb made DTS a family affair. Their children, Daniel, John, and Mary attended DTS, where they met their spouses. All six are graduates. Dave currently serves as an elder in a church pastored by one son and in writing a commentary on Matthew with another son. Their son-in-law and daughter are on staff at a church in Tennessee. Dave and Deb have seven grandchildren.
Review
Jul 21, 2018
D. Scott BarfootD. Scott Barfoot
Teams That Thrive: Five Disciplines of Collaborative Church Leadership. One of the greatest theological insights embodied in the triune God, the biblical institution of marriage, and the local church is the worship-inspiring and transformational...
Review
Jul 21, 2018
Joseph D. FantinJoseph D. Fantin
Acts: An Exegetical Commentary. Volume 4: 24:1–28:31. Now complete, Craig Keener’s four volume, 4501 page (xlii + 4459), 10¾ inch (27.5 cm) wide, 19 lb (8.62 kg) commentary, with more than 45,000 ancient nonbiblical references on...